Planetary magnetospheres

The decametric emission of Jupiter is well known since the 1950s, via the Maser-cyclotron interactions with Io and Ganymede. Cyclotron emission, between 20 MHz and a few GHz, is highly variable and its observation has led to important results in plasma physics. This technique also constitutes a possible way of detecting giant extra-solar planets.

The decametric emission of Jupiter is well known since the 1950s, via the Maser-cyclotron interactions with Io and Ganymede. Cyclotron emission, between 20 MHz and a few GHz, is highly variable and its observation has led to important results in plasma physics. This technique also constitutes a possible way of detecting giant extra-solar planets.

The electrostatic emission in Saturn’s atmosphere is associated with lightning storms and is therefore sporadic. Their observation from the ground at low frequencies has required a trigger by the Cassini probe (in operation until 2018). The group already has UTR2, WSRT and LOFAR data, which can be supplemented by observations with NenuFAR.

The team is also looking for the radio emission of extra-solar planets, whose plasma instabilities in the magnetosphere produce the same cyclotron emissions as on Jupiter. Observations are underway with LOFAR, both in imaging and dynamic spectroscopy. This program will increase in power from the first detection, or will be limited to a few years to obtain upper limits. It will also be an ideal project for NenuFAR, once the signal characterization/calibration is effective.